Grandmother Wisdom – Embracing Our Matrilineal Inheritance

Our Unbroken Matrilineal Rhythm

I have often opened women’s circles with each woman introducing herself and her matrilineal lineage. I am Teresa, daughter of Betty, daughter of Ruth. It is wonderful to hear each woman say the feminine names of her lineage and feel the circle embraced by feminine ancestors. In When the Women Were Drummers, author Layne Redmond describes our physical embodiment of our grandmother’s rhythm. When our grandmother was pregnant with our mother, we were there as part of an egg in our mother’s ovary, pulsing to the rhythm of our grandmother’s blood flowing through her body as our mother developed in our grandmother’s womb. (P. 170)*

What a wonderful awareness!

The three generations, pregnant mother, daughter, and daughter’s future children are pulsing in synchronized rhythm, nestled in each other like Russian nesting dolls. The ABC Path toward True Wisdom: A Woman’s Guide to Trusting What She Knows in Her Heart is True, P. 115**

This is an unbroken matrilineal rhythm that goes all the way back to our founding mother around 150,000 years ago.

In human genetics, the Mitochondrial Eve (also mt-Eve, mt-MRCA) is the matrilineal most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of all living humans. In other words, she is defined as the most recent woman from whom all living humans descend in an unbroken line purely through their mothers and through the mothers of those mothers, back until all lines converge on one woman.Mitochondrial Eve, Wikipedia, February 21, 2021***

Also, as an unbroken matrilineal DNA link from mother to daughter, it speaks to the wisdom of our ancestral grandmothers embedded in our cells. According to the latest brain/mind research mapping the source of our wisdom as humans, we have access to innate, universal wisdom from our earliest evolutionary experiences. And we can tap into images that surface from deep within during meditation, dreams, and contemplative activities. The Neurobiology of the Gods, p. 54-55.****

What Do You Know About Your Mother’s Mother?

Take some time to sit in reflection with these questions. Quiet your mind and let the questions fill your heart. Allow the responses to surface from a deep place within.

  1. What is (was) my mother’s mother like? What do I know about her from family stories and personal experiences?
  2. What does (did) she look like? What is my most prominent image of her?
  3. What is (was) her life like? What have I learned about her over the years? What have I learned from her?
  4. Who am I now, because of her? What wisdom do I carry in my heart because of her?

Questions for Circle Discussion

  1. What was this reflection on your Grandmother like for you?
  2. What insights or clarity surfaced for you during the reflection?
  3. What, if anything, would you like to share about your Mother’s Mother?

To get the most from your Circle gathering, read the Circle Guidelines.

*Redmond, Layne. When the Drummers Were Women: A Spiritual History of Rhythm. New York: Three Rivers Press, 1997.

**Lampmann, Teresa. The ABC Path toward True Wisdom: A Woman’s Guide to Trusting What She Knows in Her Heart Is True,  Remembered Rhythms” p. 115-119.

***https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitochondrial_Eve, Mitochondrial Eve, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, February 21, 2021.

****Goodwyn, Erik, The Neurobiology of the Gods: How Brain Physiology Shapes the Recurrent Imagery of Myth and Dreams, London and New York, Routledge, 2012.

Permission to reproduce this post in its entirety is granted for use in privately hosted women’s circles and non-profit programs only.

For use in for-profit women’s circles and programs, written permission is required to reproduce any portion of this post.

©2021 Teresa Lampmann
WisdomsDelight.com

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